The Emperor’s Medicine, LLC
932 N. Wright, Suite 120
Naperville, IL 60563

Ph. 630-428-9001

Acupuncture For Your Pet? Who Would Have Thought…

Have You Considered Acupuncture for Your Pets? Vol 15 Issue 76 Would you like to see your arthritic best friend jump down from the vet’s table and romp happily to the door? Would you be relieved to see him get relief from hot spots? How about improving his breathing – do you have a short-snouted dog that tends to be asthmatic? Does your furriest member of the family have diarrhea, constipation or other digestive upsets? You might want to give pet Acupuncture a try. Acupuncture for animals is not new – it started being used on humans 4,500 years ago; for animals it started around 200 A.D. It was primarily used for work horses and farm animals, but these days, when even apartment dwellers have pets, it is not uncommon for cats and dogs to also get treatments. As with humans, Acupuncture is safe for animals. Sometimes it works immediately, and sometimes pets can become sleepy or lethargic for a day or two after a treatment. But usually that’s just an indication that the Acupuncture is working; within a short time you should see some improvement. Acupuncture has been used to successfully treat many conditions in animals. The list is long, but some of the most common are: • Musculoskelatal problems like arthritis or degenerative disc disease • Skin problems • Respiratory disorders • Gastrointestinal upsets • Reproductive issues • Treatment of injuries It can also be used as maintenance, to keep your pet in optimal health. If you’re looking for a way to keep your pet healthy without drugs and surgery, speak with your acupuncturist about possible treatment. Or, if your acupuncturist...

Acupuncture Studies With Autism

Acupuncture Studies Show Significant Improvement in Autism Vol 15 Issue 78 According to three studies conducted over the last few years, Acupuncture may be just what kids with autism need to improve their condition. Two of the studies involved giving children scalp Acupuncture. The most recent was published in August, 2011, and an earlier one was published in 2008. A third study, which used electro-acupuncture, is from July, 2010. In one of the scalp Acupuncture studies, researchers worked with 70 children aged 2 through 6. Of the 70 children, 40 received music therapy and structured teaching. Structured teaching involves helping the children set up and organize their physical environment and minimizing physical and auditory distractions. The secondgroup, consisting of the remaining 30 children, also participated in music therapy and structured teaching, but 60 treatments of scalp Acupuncture were added to their treatment. A study involving electro-acupuncture consisted of 12 sessions with participants aged 3 through 18. It was the first double-blind, randomized, controlled study ever conducted using electro-acupuncture for autism. Significant positive results were seen in all studies. They included improvement in: • intelligence • language ability • social adaptive ability • language comprehension • self-care ability • social initiation • receptive language • motor skills and coordination, including better writing ability, writing within the lines, better walking posture, speed of walking, and the ability to go up and down stairs • coordination • attention span The exact number of people with autism in the U.S. is unknown, although it is known that the numbers have increased – autism used to affect about 1 in 5,000 children; some estimate that the numbers are now...

Acupuncture For Treatment of Warts vs. Topical Ointments

Acupuncture Treatment for Warts Beats Topical Ointments Volume 16 Issue 14 A new study published in the International Journal of Dermatology has found that the ancient Oriental practice of Acupuncture is phenomenally successful at treating what are called “flat warts” – far more successful than the ointments most commonly prescribed. Flat warts affect teenagers and children more than adults, so they are often called “juvenile warts”. They are generally quite small, often as small as a pinhead, and have flat tops that are smooth to the touch rather than rough and bumpy like the domed, cauliflower-like tops of common warts. Dozens of flat warts, even as many as 100, can be clustered on one body part. They are often found on the cheeks, forehead, chin, neck, arms, or hands. Although they are approximately the same color as the surrounding skin, they are easy to see, and are considered “unsightly” – a good reason for teenagers, especially, to want them to vanish. Young people often “grow out” of their flat wart infestation, when their immune systems successfully defeat the viruses that are causing the warts. But sometimes flat warts persist for months, or even years. And they are very contagious, easily spread on contact not only to other parts of the body, but to other family members and friends. All in all, people with flat warts – and their families and friends – are only too happy to see the end of the flat wart invasion. No easy medical treatment has ever been found particularly effective for getting rid of flat warts. Modern medical science has failed to find a cure. However, a new study of auricular...

Acupuncture Relieves Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

Acupuncture Relieves Symptoms of Fibromyalgia Vol 16 Issue 2 Fibromyalgia, a condition characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood swings, affects three to six million people in the U.S. Among the most common treatments are antidepressants and painkillers, both of which have dangerous side effects and can actually exacerbate the condition. However, according to a Mayo Clinic study, Acupuncture is successful at reducing the symptoms of fibromyalgia so patients can function well without drugs. The study, conducted by Dr. David P. Martin, M.D., PhD and published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, involved 50 patients suffering from fibromyalgia. Half the participants were given Acupuncture, and the other half were not. The participants’ symptoms were assessed using Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Multidimensional Pain Inventory. These were conducted prior to treatment, immediately after treatment, and at one month and seven months after treatment. The Acupuncture group was given a total of six treatments, one every two to four days over a period of two to three weeks. The most dramatic improvements were seen one month after treatment and included significant reduction of fatigue, anxiety and pain. The results were compared to those obtained with antidepressants and painkillers and Acupuncture was found to be as effective as, or more effective than, drugs. People with fibromyalgia are at risk for a host of other diseases and conditions, including serious digestive dysfunction, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis, hypoglycemia and many others. Not only are these conditions serious problems in themselves, they can also exacerbate the fibromyalgia. Taking drugs to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia also introduces a host of other complications and side effects. Acupuncture...

Drive Down Blood Pressure – Recover from Stroke With Acupuncture

Volume 10 Issue 17 The calming and regenerative effects of Acupuncture have long been known. Now, Acupuncture is becoming more widely recognized as an alternative therapy for curbing high blood pressure as well as aiding those recovering from a stroke. Hypertension, elevated levels of blood pressure, is sometimes referred to as a “Silent Killer.” Of the 50 million Americans who suffer from some form of it, estimates show that 35% of them may not even be aware of its presence in their life. With hypertension the body, and especially the heart, must work with extra force to perform daily functions. This often occurs without visible symptoms. It is important that those potentially affected see a doctor or a Traditional Chinese Medicine physician to be checked for these subtle symptoms. An Acupuncture study offering hope and positive results for hypertension sufferers has recently been conducted at the University of California Irvine by Dr. John C. Longhurst. While in this case the test subjects were hypertensive rats, the results support the link between endorphin release and decreased heart activity. In addition to traditional Acupuncture methods, needles charged with a low frequency electrical stimulation were also proven to be effective in this study. With these positive findings, the reduction of hypertension in patients could reduce the need for drugs to control the condition, as well as eliminate the onset of strokes. Should a stroke occur, however, Acupuncture is known to be greatly effective in the improvement of motor and cognitive skills. Scalp Acupuncture, in particular, is the favored application using methods developed and popularized by Professor Ming Quing Zhu, a 1964 graduate of the Shanghai University of Traditional...

Dry Eyes Benefit From Acupuncture Treatments

Volume 11 Issue 64 People who suffer from a condition known as dry eye syndrome often experience quite a number of irritations with their vision. Dryness, a burning sensation and sandy-gritty eye discomfort are just some of the symptoms that seem to increase in sensation as the day progresses. In one such case, Rebecca had been suffering the condition for 3 years. The dry eye pain was described as excruciating during the day and caused problems with her sleep as well. At times, her eyes were so dry she literally had to peel her eyelids off her eyes, she said. Numerous trips to doctors and one to a dietitian produced no results. She decided as a last resort to try Acupuncture. Even though the initial treatments showed no marked results, she decided to continue with her program because of confidence in the acupuncturist. After 14 treatments that included Chinese herbs as well, her condition literally improved overnight. All of her symptoms disappeared and have been gone for over a year. That Acupuncture improves dry eye syndrome was the focus of a recent study conducted at the China Medical University in Taiwan. A group of 43 dry eye syndrome patients were divided into a control group, a second group that received Acupuncture and a third group that received SSP electro-therapy. (SSP is Silver Spike Point low frequency electro-therapy, also known as Needle Free Acupuncture.) All of the participants first received an artificial tears treatment. The Acupuncture and the SSP groups then each received two 20-minute treatments of Acupuncture or SSP. Several different measurement tools were used to determine tear production including the Schirmer’s test where...

Painful Foot Condition Helped With Acupuncture

Vol. 12 Issue 88 When a person has constant pain in the bottom of their feet, life is not very pleasant. Walking is a difficult task when every step is uncomfortable. Athletic competition often needs to be put on hold, and getting any exercise at all becomes a very difficult task. These are the lifestyle changes that frequently occur when a person develops plantar fasciitis. This is a condition that results when a broad, ligament-like area of the lower part of the foot (known as the plantar fascia, which extends from heel to toe) becomes inflamed. The condition strikes people with widely ranging lifestyles including most commonly those who are obese, and those who are athletes or that do a considerable amount of walking or standing. Medical treatment for the problem includes traditional therapies like ice, total rest, orthotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, cortisone shots or even surgery. Traditional Acupuncture as well as electoacupuncture may offer considerable hope and relief for people who have come to live with this condition. Here is a success story from one woman named Pat Fokas who experienced relief with Acupuncture treatment: “Nothing worked to heal and take away the pain from my plantar fasciitis. I tried cortisone treatments, special orthotic shoe equipment, and anti-inflammatory medicines. Some days I could barely walk. Then my neighbor recommended Acupuncture. I am a 50 year old woman who has never visited an acupuncturist before this. Out of desperation I started treatment. It has been 6 months now and I no longer have any pain. I can wear any shoes and I can walk barefoot, which was impossible in the past due to the...

Conditions Treatable By Acupuncture

Volume 14 Issue 134   An official report on four categories of symptoms, conditions and diseases for which Acupuncture is, or may be, effective, was published some years ago by the World Health Organization (WHO). The landmark report, “Acupuncture: Review and Analysis of Reports on Controlled Clinical Trials”, is available on the WHO website as a PDF file (see link at end of this Health Report). In the past few months we have covered the first two list categories in the WHO report: conditions for which Acupuncture has been shown through controlled trials to be treated effectively by Acupuncture, and conditions for which the therapeutic effect of Acupuncture has been shown but for which further proof is needed. The WHO report also contains two more categories of conditions for which Acupuncture has been shown to be helpful. The first of these two final categories is a list of conditions for which there are only individual controlled trials reporting some therapeutic effects of Acupuncture, but for which Acupuncture is worth trying because treatment by conventional and other therapies is difficult: Central serous choroidopathy – fluid build-up under the retina Color blindness Deafness Hypophrenia – mental retardation Irritable colon syndrome Neuropathic bladder in spinal cord injury Chronic pulmonary heart disease Small airway obstruction The second of the two final categories is a list of conditions for which Acupuncture may be tried provided the practitioner has special modern medical knowledge and adequate monitoring equipment: Breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Coma Convulsions in infants Angina pectoris (pain of coronary heart disease) Diarrhea in infants and young children Late stage viral encephalitis in children Progressive bulbar and...

A Positive Attitude Brings A Better Chance Of Acupuncture Success!

Volume 11 Issue 77 High hopes and great expectations when going into any endeavor probably offers the best potential to bring about the most positive results. According to a recent study published in the journal called Pain, this is certainly true in the case of Acupuncture. Actual Acupuncture was compared to sham (minimal Acupuncture) treatment in the cases of 864 persons involved in four different clinical trials. The study was conducted by Klause Linde and colleagues from the Centre for Complementary Medicine Research of Munich, Germany. Patients were asked the following two questions before receiving three treatments. How effective do you consider Acupuncture in general? What do you personally expect from the Acupuncture treatment you will receive? After the three treatments, the participants were also asked: How confident do you feel that this treatment can alleviate your complaint? Analysis of patient responses showed the following according to researchers: “In our four randomized trails, patients with high expectations were more likely to report better outcomes than patients with lower expectations, both after treatment and four months later.” Interestingly, the sham Acupuncture recipients did show greater improvements if their expectations were high as well. “The effect was observed both in patients receiving the “true’ and the minimal Acupuncture,” the researchers said. Further examinations lead the researchers to speculate that perhaps a nurturing environment helps to foster this positive attitude. “Intense and frequent provider-patient interaction, touch, needling pain, and an ‘exotic’ framework could make Acupuncture a strong ‘ritual’ which is associated with stronger expectation effects than other interventions.” The findings clearly emphasized that fostering a positive patient attitude toward Acupuncture and Chinese medicine can have a pronounced influence...

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